Elizabeth J. Sparrow

"Sparrow's novel about two aristocratic families coping with World War I and the Irish War of Independence is expertly plotted and features well drawn characters and solid prose. The female protagonist, Lacey, is a headstrong heroine, but nonetheless nuanced. She's equally drawn to a family friend 10 years her senior and a street-tough orphan closer in age. Both could be described as bad boys, a choice guaranteed to heat up the sex scenes."
- Critic's Report, The Booklife Prize in Fiction




The Irish Tempest


Ireland, 1911: After seven centuries of unyielding oppression, there is a tempest rising, a national yearning for Irish independence. It threatens to sweep away all that is precious to the very privileged O'Rourke and de la Roche families. Seismic changes are but a whisper away.

What begins as a squabbling friendship between the wastrel Courtland O'Rourke and the defiant, mischief-maker Lacey de la Roche matures into a deeply passionate, tempestuous love, fraught with secrets of lethal consequences and sins of omission.

The Irish Tempest beckons the reader into a world where landowner and tenant farmer, the well-off and the working-class are chafing under the choke-hold of British domination.

Pulled apart by political and social conflicts, Court and Lacey experience the world from perspectives both transformative and destructive. Court, compelled to accept a commission in the British army, initiates a disastrous affair with rippling aftershocks. Lacey, fueled by the arrogance of adolescence, is beguiled by a charismatic but sociopathic horse trainer.

The Irish Tempest thrusts the reader into the anguish of the 1916 Easter Rising and beyond.